Prof Sandra Eldridge

Executive Member, Primary Health Care Scientists co-lead and SAPC mentor

Mentor biography

Sandra Eldridge is Professor of Biostatistics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. She has been joint lead of the Centre for Primary Care and Public Health since 2007. The Centre has grown considerably since 2007.

Sandra has a degree in mathematics and spent time teaching mathematics in schools in Nigeria and the UK, conducting demographic research, and teaching undergraduate statistics before leaving work to spend time with her young children in the late 1980s. 

She joined Barts and The London as a medical statistician in 1994, and almost immediately began working in primary care, moving to be part of the then Department of General Practice and Primary Care in 1996. Primary care has been the focus of her work since. She completed a doctorate focused on cluster randomised trials in primary care (rather late in her career) in 2005, and was promoted to a personal chair in 2007 at about the same time as becoming joint lead of the Centre.

Sandra’s major research interests are in cluster randomised trials and complex interventions, although her collaborative research is wide-ranging and she has an extensive portfolio of National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) funded research. She sits on several NIHR funding panels, directs a UK clinical research collaboration registered and NIHR funded trials unit, and is joint lead of the east London arm of Research Design Service London. She currently leads an international collaborative group developing reporting guidance for pilot studies and a sub-group of the initiative to extend the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool to non-randomised studies and trials with non-standard design. She supervises a number of research students and mentors female academics at Barts and The London, under a scheme precipitated by the institution’s Athena Swan initiative.

Sandra has always been concerned to support those trying to maintain a balance between their core discipline and working in primary care. In 2002, she was instrumental in setting up the Primary Health Care Study Group of the Royal Statistical Society, a group that aims to bring statisticians working in primary care together for mutual encouragement, support and collaboration. Sandra was secretary of this group between 2002 and 2006 and chair between 2009 and 2012. In 2012 she stepped down from the committee to make way for younger members for whom the group was intended.  

Summary biography

I graduated from Oxford with a Mathematics degree. I have taught Mathematics in the UK and Africa. I have a Masters in Medical Demography from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a PhD from the University of London. I am a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and a member of the Higher Education Academy. I am Professor of Biostatistics, joint lead of the Centre for Primary Care and Public Health at Queen Mary University of London, Director of the UKCRC registered Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit and joint lead of the east London spoke of RDS London. I sit on various funding panels for NIHR.Sandra's main research interests are cluster randomised trials and complex interventions particularly in primary care. She has published a number of key papers on cluster randomised trials. In addition to her methodological research she has responsibility for the statistical design and analysis aspects of a large number of collaborative research projects mostly concerned with the management of chronic conditions; many of these projects involve cluster randomised trials.

In my role within SAPC I am the co-lead of the PhoCuS group with Christine Bond

From the time I started working in academic primary care in 1994 I have been concerned to contribute to a Strong methodological base within the discipline. I led the setting up of the Royal Statistical Society Primary Health Care Study Group in 2002 with the aim of supporting and encouraging statisticians working in primary care. Through working on several large cluster randomized trials in the late 1990s, I developed a particular interest in these trials, completing a doctorate in this area in 2005. I am involved in many empirical trials, continue my methodological interest in cluster randomised trials and in pragmatic trials more generally, as well as in the effectiveness of complex interventions. I am involved in revision of the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and lead an international group of researchers developing reporting guidelines for pilot and feasibility studies.

Sandra is co-chair of the Phocus (Primary Healthcare Scientists) group

Articles on this site

25 Jun 2016

 

Quotes from mentees of their experience of the SAPC mentorship programme

"It has been invaluable for me – I’ve had a good relationship with my mentor who has understood my needs well. I’ve been through a lot of changes in the past 2 years-  having a baby and changing employer, and my mentor’s support has been crucial."

25 Jun 2016

Quotes from SAPC mentors of their experience of the mentorship programme

08 Dec 2015

 

The aim of the SAPC Mentorship Programme is to support academic colleagues working in departments of Primary Care.  The Programme was established initially to help primary health care scientists (non-GPs), who, because of their heterogeneous core disciplines have no other single support scheme.  We are delighted that SAPC is now able to extend the scheme to GP members.  The mentorship scheme is designed to have a positive impact on career aspirations and development for such professionals and enhance their research productivity and leadership.  In order to build a clear pathway, and community of mentorship practice, it is essential that the scheme is led and delivered by the most experienced researchers and clinical leaders from similar backgrounds.

07 Dec 2015

Together with Christine Bond, I lead the SAPC Primary Health Care Scientists (PHoCuS) group to provide focus for and support non-medically qualified members of the Society.

18 Nov 2015

Are you interested in becoming a mentor for SAPC?

The aim of the SAPC-PHoCuS Mentorship Programme is to support primary health care scientists  (ie non-medical colleagues)  working in departments of Primary Care, who, because of their heterogeneous core disciplines have no other single support scheme.  The mentorship scheme is designed to have a positive impact on career aspirations and development for such professionals and enhance their research productivity and leadership. SAPC has a group of trained mentors and would like to hear from others who would like to become a mentor.

18 Nov 2015

Are you interested in becoming a mentee with SAPC?

The Mentorship scheme has been established by the primary healthcare scientists (PHoCuS) group (non-medical members) and the SAPC Executive to develop an increased number of primary health care scientists capable of operating at a world-class level and able to become the academic leaders of the future. 

29 Sep 2015

We have a mentoring scheme for academics that allows us to help enhance your career. Details of the mentors and their areas of interest are described 

24 Sep 2015

Together with Christine Bond, I lead the SAPC Primary Health Care Scientists (PHoCuS) group to provide focus for and support non-medically qualified members of the Society. The request for this group to be established came from two medically qualified SAPC members - Professor Helen Lester and Professor Peter Croft. We have to thank both of them for helping us establish the group, Helen for her vision and belief in the added value PHoCuS members brought to APC and Peter for identifying a start-up fund of £5k.

24 Aug 2015

PhoCus - The group for Primary Healthcare Scientists led by Christine Bond & Sandra Eldridge